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Florida Phosphate Gypsum Stacks Display Severe Environmental Impacts

Nov 1, 2015 |
N/A
(Fig 1, Gypsum Stack - www.tampabay.com ) One of EPA’s (Environmental Protection Agency) main concerns with phosphate mines in Florida are with gypsum stacks (gypstack). This concern ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Mining In Sovereignty Lands

Jun 19, 2016 |
N/A
Since the turn of the twentieth century, the phosphate industry purchased large tracts of land in west central Florida, including the upper Peace River watershed. Florida’s phosphate industry ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Rock Quandary

Nov 1, 2015 |
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Florida Phosphate Rock Quandary Many years ago, the ocean flooded an ancient land mass today we call Florida and a layer of sand and clay rich in tiny phosphate particles were deposited. ... Read more

Do Floridians Know About Phosphate Production’s Many Hazards?

Jan 4, 2016 |
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Florida’s phosphate industry creates many serious environmental impacts during the “wet” process in the production of fertilizer (1), including unmetered groundwater consumption. ... Read more

The Phosphate Risk: Welcome

Aug 31, 2015 |
PR: 3
The Phosphate Risk in Florida. Dragline mining machine. Phosphate companies have mined out central Florida. The phosphate depleted, the companies have ... ... Read more

Natural Spring Venue Dollars are Significant To Florida Economy

Jan 4, 2016 |
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I recall as a young boy growing up in west central Florida that natural springs were clean, fresh, and plentiful. Everyone I knew at that time had easy access to natural springs in many forms because ... Read more

Florida Residence Take FIPR Survey on the Phosphate Industry Practices

Sep 19, 2015 |
N/A
Do Florida’s residents know about the phosphate industries abysmal practice of destroying Florida’s geographical environment for the phosphate some 40 feet beneath the surface? ... Read more

Florida’s Politicians Follow the Phosphate Money

Oct 8, 2015 |
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The Florida phosphate industry demonstrates the need to donate millions of dollars to Florida’s politicians. This is easily seen by researching where, when, and how much money Florida’s ... Read more

Fertilizer Production Displays Adverse Effects On Industry Workers

Jan 18, 2016 |
N/A
(Fig. 1) Phosphate Strip Mining In Central Florida Fortunately for the United States, Central Florida is home to the largest known phosphate reserves in the world. Phosphate and its derivatives ... Read more

Phosphate Industry Strip Mining Central Florida Watersheds

May 17, 2016 |
N/A
The state of Florida owns all riparian lands and navigable waterways held in “trust” for the public at large by the sovereignty granted to Florida at statehood in 1845 by the United ... Read more

Florida Mines - Phosphate Draglines Aquifers, Overburden and Sinkholes

Jul 27, 2015 |
N/A
Florida Mines (Bone Valley) phosphate draglines causing Florida aquifer formation destruction, sinkholes, bone valley mines. ... Read more

EPA Disrespected by Florida’s Politicians Concerning Phosphate Radiation

Dec 18, 2015 |
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(Fig. 2) Phosphate Drag Line In Background - Phosphate Waste In Foreground Florida’s phosphate dilemma started a lifetime ago when fate and the Army Corps of Engineers happened to uncover ... Read more

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eMag+ Brings Revolution To Online Publishing

Dec 26, 2016 |
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Markham, Ontario: Alive Software Inc. which develops software application platforms for online publishing announced the launch of its new product. eMag+ an online publishing platform and digital ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Mining In Sovereignty Lands

Jun 19, 2016 |
N/A
Since the turn of the twentieth century, the phosphate industry purchased large tracts of land in west central Florida, including the upper Peace River watershed. Florida’s phosphate industry ... Read more

Florida Sinkholes Created By Phosphate Mining

Jun 15, 2016 |
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Florida citizens living near west-central Florida are no strangers to sinkhole formation. Unfortunately, sinkholes forming in west-central Florida are as likely to be related to regional phosphate ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Mining And The Public Trust Doctrine

Jun 12, 2016 |
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During the past seventy years of phosphate strip mining in west-central Florida, the phosphate industry has at some time been faced with strip mining navigable waterways and riparian lands as defined ... Read more

What Is a Dragline and What Does It Do?

May 26, 2016 |
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The dragline's bucket system consists of a large bucket that is suspended from a boom. The bucket is moved by many cables, chains and ropes. The hoisting rope, which is powered by either a diesel or ... Read more

Phosphate Industry Strip Mining Central Florida Watersheds

May 17, 2016 |
N/A
The state of Florida owns all riparian lands and navigable waterways held in “trust” for the public at large by the sovereignty granted to Florida at statehood in 1845 by the United ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Industry Practices Severely Disturb Navigable Waterways?

May 12, 2016 |
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Florida is known as the “Sunshine State”, but interestingly receives more rainfall than most states in the Union. Florida receives enormous amounts of yearly rainfall from north to south ... Read more

Phosphate Industry Siege On Alafia River And Watersheds

May 5, 2016 |
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The Alafia River watersheds and smaller tributaries in the area are known to be used as “navigable waterways” by the state of Florida during the early-19th century by European (1) ... Read more

Phosphate Mining In The Myakka River Watershed

May 1, 2016 |
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As a youth growing up in west central Florida, my friends and I covered countless miles of the environmentally rich landscape on foot. We pushed through wetlands, marshes, bogs, tributaries, surface ... Read more

Florida Riparian Lands And Navigable Waterway Rights

Apr 29, 2016 |
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The Peace River Valley watershed with all its tributaries, streams, bogs, marshlands, springs, and aquifers is considered by the state of Florida to be “navigable waterways” or ... Read more

Phosphate Mining The Peace River Watershed Basin

Apr 20, 2016 |
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The Peace River watershed lies in west central Florida about forty miles east of the Tampa Bay area. Florida’s Peace River was declared an “endangered river” by “American ... Read more

Florida Rivers, Springs, Lakes, And Aquifers Are Navigable Waterways With Riparian Rights?

Apr 15, 2016 |
N/A
The Peace River headwaters in west central Florida are naturally spring fed by local aquifers “contained” in the landscape. The River “meanders” some 120 miles to the ... Read more

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Do Floridians Know About Phosphate Production’s Many Hazards?

Title:
Do Floridians Know About Phosphate Production’s Many Hazards?

(Fig. 1) Phosphogypsum Stack with Breached Wall Spilling Toxic Waste

Florida residents seem to be unaware of the phosphate industry’s wastewater treatment practices. Historically, Florida’s phosphate industry wastewater treatment is not sufficient and is causing environment impacts adjacent to industry facilities.

Florida’s phosphate industry creates many serious environmental impacts during the “wet” process in the production of fertilizer (1), including unmetered groundwater consumption. The phosphate industry’s groundwater consumption and uses are of primary concern to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. For example, the state of Florida environmental protection standards requires wastewater from industry be treated to meet water quality standards before the wastewater is released to the environment.

The phosphate industry pumps the unmetered amounts of aquifer water to dilute the toxic waste produced in the process of making fertilizer so it can be legally dumped into Florida’s waterways. The state requires the phosphate industry’s toxic wastewater be treated before it is dumped. The density of the toxic wastewater mix is measured to meet state requirements for Florida’s pollution standards (4). Unfortunately, the toxic mix’s “density” is another example of the phosphate industry’s use of “smoke and mirrors” to create the illusion of following environmental standards for wastewater treatment and release.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) requires permits for the industry to pump fresh aquifer water and to dump their toxic wastewater into Florida’s waterways. The freshwater pumping came from Florida’s aquifer systems and used in the phosphate mining process. The toxic wastewater is treated and dumped locally (3) by the plant where the landscape absorbs the wastewater as surface pollutants or eventually drains into the Gulf of Mexico carried by Florida’s pristine rivers and streams.

Wastewater Treatment Requirements in Question

The density of the toxic waste mix is based on volume in this case. Density is defined as mass per volume. When one measures density, the mass of toxins being dumped is not truly being measured; because water is added to the toxic mix for dilution until state requirements are met. The phosphate industry takes advantage of the state requirements in this way. The phosphate industry understands the mass of toxins dumped can be manipulated to meet the state limits just by changing the volume of water in the mix. Technically, the phosphate industry can dump as much toxic waste as they want because the state requires the density of the solution to be below legal limits, not the mass of the pollutants. The phosphate industry calls the dilution process “blending”.

The following paragraph illustrates the “dilution” process dilemma. The Florida DEP representative reiterates the same requirements in their words.

It's allowed under the state Department of Environmental Protection's rules, said the Southwest Florida Water Management District, the agency commonly known as Swiftmud. Without that freshwater to dilute it, what Mosaic is discharging would violate the DEP's limits on a type of pollution called "conductivity," SWIFTMUD explained. (4)

Unmetered Groundwater Pumping Permits

Florida’s phosphate industry’s well-water consumption permits are unmetered, so groundwater is pumped without restrictions. In this way, they can dilute the toxic wastewater without repercussion because the state requirements for release are not based on the mass of toxic waste being dumped. The state of Florida does not regulate the mass of toxins being dumped in treated wastewater because the density of the toxic mix is purposely based on volume, not mass.

One can see this first hand by visiting central Florida phosphate processing plants when the dew is in the air with just a bit of early morning fog. When one looks at the phosphate plant in the pre-dawn hours, one will see the plant lighted with a haze forming a dome over and around the plant. (2) If one is close enough to the plant one will smell then taste an acidic odor. The smell and taste come from the process in the phosphate plant and is highly toxic. The odor one smells and tastes is from acidic fumes rising around the plant facilities and carried by the fog. The toxins precipitate in the surrounding mist with noxious acidic fumes produced by the production of fertilizer. The toxic haze is most irritating to one’s nose, eyes, throat, and respiratory system.

Central Florida’s phosphate industry creates environmental pollutants on a daily basis. Water consumption by phosphate production has been shown to lower aquifer water levels in turn forming spring degradation and water shortages. Florida residents should contact their elected officials concerning the phosphate industry aquifer water consumption and use practices and tell Tallahassee, wastewater treatment industry practices as unacceptable.

Reference

1 "FGS" Florida Minerals. n.p.

2. "Floridians Fear Pollution 'Killing Us'" tribunedigital. n.p.,

3. "The Phosphate Fertilizer Industry: An Environmental Overview" .

4. Southwest Florida Water Management District, Swiftmud

Davey Crockett - https://www.flmines.com - Florida Mines

Owner Name:
Davey Crockett
Owner Email:
daveycx@yahoo.com
Meta Keywords:
do floridians know about phosphate production’s many hazards?,environmental health,davey crockett
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Florida’s phosphate industry creates many serious environmental impacts during the “wet” process in the production of fertilizer (1), including unmetered groundwater consumption. The phosphate industry’s groundwater consumption and uses are of primary concern to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. For example, the state of Florida environmental protection standards requires wastewater from industry be treated to meet water quality standards before the wastewater is released to the environment.

The phosphate industry pumps the unmetered amounts of aquifer water to dilute the toxic waste produced in the process of making fertilizer so it can be legally dumped into Florida’s waterways. The state requires the phosphate industry’s toxic wastewater be treated before it is dumped. The density of the toxic wastewater mix is measured to meet state requirements for Florida’s pollution standards (4). Unfortunately, the toxic mix’s “density” is another example of the phosphate industry’s use of “smoke and mirrors” to create the illusion of following environmental standards for wastewater treatment and release.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) requires permits for the industry to pump fresh aquifer water and to dump their toxic wastewater into Florida’s waterways. The freshwater pumping came from Florida’s aquifer systems and used in the phosphate mining process. The toxic wastewater is treated and dumped locally (3) by the plant where the landscape absorbs the wastewater as surface pollutants or eventually drains into the Gulf of Mexico carried by Florida’s pristine rivers and streams.

Wastewater Treatment Requirements in Question

The density of the toxic waste mix is based on volume in this case. Density is defined as mass per volume. When one measures density, the mass of toxins being dumped is not truly being measured; because water is added to the toxic mix for dilution until state requirements are met. The phosphate industry takes advantage of the state requirements in this way. The phosphate industry understands the mass of toxins dumped can be manipulated to meet the state limits just by changing the volume of water in the mix. Technically, the phosphate industry can dump as much toxic waste as they want because the state requires the density of the solution to be below legal limits, not the mass of the pollutants. The phosphate industry calls the dilution process “blending”.

The following paragraph illustrates the “dilution” process dilemma. The Florida DEP representative reiterates the same requirements in their words.

It's allowed under the state Department of Environmental Protection's rules, said the Southwest Florida Water Management District, the agency commonly known as Swiftmud. Without that freshwater to dilute it, what Mosaic is discharging would violate the DEP's limits on a type of pollution called "conductivity," SWIFTMUD explained. (4)

Unmetered Groundwater Pumping Permits

Florida’s phosphate industry’s well-water consumption permits are unmetered, so groundwater is pumped without restrictions. In this way, they can dilute the toxic wastewater without repercussion because the state requirements for release are not based on the mass of toxic waste being dumped. The state of Florida does not regulate the mass of toxins being dumped in treated wastewater because the density of the toxic mix is purposely based on volume, not mass.

One can see this first hand by visiting central Florida phosphate processing plants when the dew is in the air with just a bit of early morning fog. When one looks at the phosphate plant in the pre-dawn hours, one will see the plant lighted with a haze forming a dome over and around the plant. (2) If one is close enough to the plant one will smell then taste an acidic odor. The smell and taste come from the process in the phosphate plant and is highly toxic. The odor one smells and tastes is from acidic fumes rising around the plant facilities and carried by the fog. The toxins precipitate in the surrounding mist with noxious acidic fumes produced by the production of fertilizer. The toxic haze is most irritating to one’s nose, eyes, throat, and respiratory system.

Central Florida’s phosphate industry creates environmental pollutants on a daily basis. Water consumption by phosphate production has been shown to lower aquifer water levels in turn forming spring degradation and water shortages. Florida residents should contact their elected officials concerning the phosphate industry aquifer water consumption and use practices and tell Tallahassee, wastewater treatment industry practices as unacceptable.

Reference

1 "FGS" Florida Minerals. n.p.

2. "Floridians Fear Pollution 'Killing Us'" tribunedigital. n.p.,

3. "The Phosphate Fertilizer Industry: An Environmental Overview" .

4. Southwest Florida Water Management District, Swiftmud

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