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Florida Phosphate Gypsum Stacks Display Severe Environmental Impacts

Nov 1, 2015 |
N/A
(Fig 1, Gypsum Stack - www.tampabay.com ) One of EPA’s (Environmental Protection Agency) main concerns with phosphate mines in Florida are with gypsum stacks (gypstack). This concern ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Mining In Sovereignty Lands

Jun 19, 2016 |
N/A
Since the turn of the twentieth century, the phosphate industry purchased large tracts of land in west central Florida, including the upper Peace River watershed. Florida’s phosphate industry ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Rock Quandary

Nov 1, 2015 |
N/A
Florida Phosphate Rock Quandary Many years ago, the ocean flooded an ancient land mass today we call Florida and a layer of sand and clay rich in tiny phosphate particles were deposited. ... Read more

Do Floridians Know About Phosphate Production’s Many Hazards?

Jan 4, 2016 |
N/A
Florida’s phosphate industry creates many serious environmental impacts during the “wet” process in the production of fertilizer (1), including unmetered groundwater consumption. ... Read more

The Phosphate Risk: Welcome

Aug 31, 2015 |
PR: 3
The Phosphate Risk in Florida. Dragline mining machine. Phosphate companies have mined out central Florida. The phosphate depleted, the companies have ... ... Read more

Natural Spring Venue Dollars are Significant To Florida Economy

Jan 4, 2016 |
N/A
I recall as a young boy growing up in west central Florida that natural springs were clean, fresh, and plentiful. Everyone I knew at that time had easy access to natural springs in many forms because ... Read more

Florida Residence Take FIPR Survey on the Phosphate Industry Practices

Sep 19, 2015 |
N/A
Do Florida’s residents know about the phosphate industries abysmal practice of destroying Florida’s geographical environment for the phosphate some 40 feet beneath the surface? ... Read more

Florida’s Politicians Follow the Phosphate Money

Oct 8, 2015 |
N/A
The Florida phosphate industry demonstrates the need to donate millions of dollars to Florida’s politicians. This is easily seen by researching where, when, and how much money Florida’s ... Read more

Fertilizer Production Displays Adverse Effects On Industry Workers

Jan 18, 2016 |
N/A
(Fig. 1) Phosphate Strip Mining In Central Florida Fortunately for the United States, Central Florida is home to the largest known phosphate reserves in the world. Phosphate and its derivatives ... Read more

Florida Mines - Phosphate Draglines Aquifers, Overburden and Sinkholes

Jul 27, 2015 |
N/A
Florida Mines (Bone Valley) phosphate draglines causing Florida aquifer formation destruction, sinkholes, bone valley mines. ... Read more

EPA Disrespected by Florida’s Politicians Concerning Phosphate Radiation

Dec 18, 2015 |
N/A
(Fig. 2) Phosphate Drag Line In Background - Phosphate Waste In Foreground Florida’s phosphate dilemma started a lifetime ago when fate and the Army Corps of Engineers happened to uncover ... Read more

Phosphate Industry Strip Mining Central Florida Watersheds

May 17, 2016 |
N/A
The state of Florida owns all riparian lands and navigable waterways held in “trust” for the public at large by the sovereignty granted to Florida at statehood in 1845 by the United ... Read more

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eMag+ Brings Revolution To Online Publishing

Dec 26, 2016 |
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Markham, Ontario: Alive Software Inc. which develops software application platforms for online publishing announced the launch of its new product. eMag+ an online publishing platform and digital ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Mining In Sovereignty Lands

Jun 19, 2016 |
N/A
Since the turn of the twentieth century, the phosphate industry purchased large tracts of land in west central Florida, including the upper Peace River watershed. Florida’s phosphate industry ... Read more

Florida Sinkholes Created By Phosphate Mining

Jun 15, 2016 |
N/A
Florida citizens living near west-central Florida are no strangers to sinkhole formation. Unfortunately, sinkholes forming in west-central Florida are as likely to be related to regional phosphate ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Mining And The Public Trust Doctrine

Jun 12, 2016 |
N/A
During the past seventy years of phosphate strip mining in west-central Florida, the phosphate industry has at some time been faced with strip mining navigable waterways and riparian lands as defined ... Read more

What Is a Dragline and What Does It Do?

May 26, 2016 |
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The dragline's bucket system consists of a large bucket that is suspended from a boom. The bucket is moved by many cables, chains and ropes. The hoisting rope, which is powered by either a diesel or ... Read more

Phosphate Industry Strip Mining Central Florida Watersheds

May 17, 2016 |
N/A
The state of Florida owns all riparian lands and navigable waterways held in “trust” for the public at large by the sovereignty granted to Florida at statehood in 1845 by the United ... Read more

Florida Phosphate Industry Practices Severely Disturb Navigable Waterways?

May 12, 2016 |
N/A
Florida is known as the “Sunshine State”, but interestingly receives more rainfall than most states in the Union. Florida receives enormous amounts of yearly rainfall from north to south ... Read more

Phosphate Industry Siege On Alafia River And Watersheds

May 5, 2016 |
N/A
The Alafia River watersheds and smaller tributaries in the area are known to be used as “navigable waterways” by the state of Florida during the early-19th century by European (1) ... Read more

Phosphate Mining In The Myakka River Watershed

May 1, 2016 |
N/A
As a youth growing up in west central Florida, my friends and I covered countless miles of the environmentally rich landscape on foot. We pushed through wetlands, marshes, bogs, tributaries, surface ... Read more

Florida Riparian Lands And Navigable Waterway Rights

Apr 29, 2016 |
N/A
The Peace River Valley watershed with all its tributaries, streams, bogs, marshlands, springs, and aquifers is considered by the state of Florida to be “navigable waterways” or ... Read more

Phosphate Mining The Peace River Watershed Basin

Apr 20, 2016 |
N/A
The Peace River watershed lies in west central Florida about forty miles east of the Tampa Bay area. Florida’s Peace River was declared an “endangered river” by “American ... Read more

Florida Rivers, Springs, Lakes, And Aquifers Are Navigable Waterways With Riparian Rights?

Apr 15, 2016 |
N/A
The Peace River headwaters in west central Florida are naturally spring fed by local aquifers “contained” in the landscape. The River “meanders” some 120 miles to the ... Read more

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Florida’s Phosphate Industry Display Poor Environmental Stewardship And Reclamation Policy

Title:
Florida’s Phosphate Industry Display Poor Environmental Stewardship And Reclamation Policy

Abnormal algae growth in Florida’s local aquifers and springs is a sign of an ill aquatic ecosystem. Phosphorus and nitrogen pollutants are known to cause abnormal algae growth. Florida’s phosphate strip mining industry is a significant source of both of these pollutants in local ecosystems, aquifers and spring systems.

One reason for Florida’s spring degradation dilemma is because until recently, no one thought to keep track of flow rates, temperature, dissolved oxygen concentrations, and algae growth or “water chemistry” in Florida’s springs. The scientific community incorrectly deemed these variables stable, so the spring’s water chemistry went unchecked. These variables are now known to fluctuate naturally on a regular cycle. The natural fluctuation of these variables is consistent with the health of the spring in question (1). Meaning, when any of the variables differ from normal ranges, the entire aquatic ecosystem associated with the spring degrades as well.

Abnormal algae growth in a spring indicates the spring is in ill health, including the aquifer supplying the spring, and the eco-system in and around the spring. Algae growth in the spring and aquifer system can indicate a higher than average concentration of phosphorus or nitrogen nutrients (pollutants) (4). Both of the pollutants mentioned are in many of Florida’s springs with higher than average concentrations.

Springs displaying abnormal algae growth are directly related to spring health and can be toxic to humans as well. Over 140 algae related cases involving humans have been reported by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). The FDEP now requires limits based on nutrient (pollutant) concentration (mass/volume) in spring water.

It seems that nitrogen-based pollutants attract more media attention than phosphorus based pollutants. The media focus is usually based on complaints about seepage of cattle dung and nitrogen-based fertilizers, from run-off, being absorbed by the landscape, and then absorbed in the local spring and aquifer systems.

Phosphorus-based pollutants are just as deadly to Florida’s aquifer and spring systems as nitrogen-based pollutants. These pollutants also come from cattle and crop production, but phosphorus based pollutants can come from other sources such as phosphate strip mining and mining facilities as well.

The FDEP published a maximum standard for phosphorus concentrations, one of the primary pollutants of concern in state-owned springs. The standards are used to establish benchmarks on the amount of phosphorus found in springs for the protection of Florida’s state-owned aquatic ecosystems. The privately-owned springs and ecosystems are the responsibility of their owners and not regulated by the state of Florida. You can see that Florida officials in FDEP now regulate the state-owned springs and aquatic ecosystems to keep water quality in the acceptable range.

The phosphate industry is issued mining permits by the counties and state of Florida which “permits” the complete removal and destruction of the aquifer and spring systems, which the phosphate industry considers as overburden or waste materials. Historically, Florida’s phosphate industry practices “display” little concern for Florida’s aquatic ecosystems. Since the early twentieth century, west-central Florida earth has been “stripped” of its natural beauty for the phosphate rock just beneath the surface. Florida’s scarred surface, caused by massive draglines in and around Polk County, Florida is only one facet of destroying Florida’s natural resources at a whim. Another issue concerns the natural hydrogeological formations succumbed to the dragline for total decimation. This issue of total decimation of hydrogeological formations does not see much attention and should receive more.

The Whole Truth

Florida’s phosphate industry is not telling the whole truth about their reclamation of existing ex-mining sites. The pursuit of valuable phosphate matrix happens by stripping it “totally” and “completely” out of the earth’s surface some fifty to one hundred feet in depth. The phosphate drag line digs through the aquifer systems, crushing and removing its very existence. An entire local hydrogeological (3) system now fails to do what nature intended, store clean freshwater.

You can see Florida’s phosphate industry practices are detrimental to Florida’s unique natural ecosystems. The phosphate industry cannot reclaim springs and aquifers acre for acre as described by Florida law, simply because the technology to do so does not exist.

However, phosphate industry officials bolster their claims of total land reclamation as seen on local television commercials and other forms of media. Phosphate officials publish reports of complete land reclamation related to former mining sites in localized targeted areas. I know because I see their advertising commercials as well. The reclamation bolstered by the phosphate industry does not include the spring and aquifers systems, because these aquatic systems take nature thousands of years to form.

Reclamation Phase?

I recall riding motorcycles at abandoned mining sites in the 1970’s. The mined “pits” which the phosphate industry abandoned were close to my home as a youth. The abandoned sites I frequented as a youth had no visible enclosure, confinement, containment, or posted warning placards. We used to drive in the abandoned mines pits, directly from a public road unabated and unloaded our bikes and ride for miles inside the abandoned pits. The mining leftovers appeared as barren as a moonscape. Unfortunately, I did not know toxic materials existed in these waste dumps, including heavy metals, piled in highly concentrated mounds.

If one lives in the area of west-central Florida, I challenge you to see for yourself. If one lives in this area, the trip to see the “real” phosphate industry will be but a short car ride. One will see the phosphate industry from a different point of view. The sites mentioned above were numerous, unattended, and still toxic to humans.

The phosphate mining industry in Florida shows many signs of environmental impacts including, abnormal algae growth in Florida’s aquifers and springs, abandoned toxic mining sites, and very few reclamation projects to mention.

Reference

1. Biologist Jim Heffernan, a post-doctoral researcher, and Professor at Florida International University

2. Florida's vanishing springs | Tampa Bay Time

3. Southwest Florida Water Management District

4. The Journey of Water. Florida Springs com

Davey Crockett - https://www.flmines.com - Florida Mines

Owner Name:
daveycx
Owner Email:
daveycx@yahoo.com
Meta Keywords:
florida’s phosphate industry display poor environmental stewardship and reclamation policy,environmental health,daveycx
Meta Description:

One reason for Florida’s spring degradation dilemma is because until recently, no one thought to keep track of flow rates, temperature, dissolved oxygen concentrations, and algae growth or “water chemistry” in Florida’s springs. The scientific community incorrectly deemed these variables stable, so the spring’s water chemistry went unchecked. These variables are now known to fluctuate naturally on a regular cycle. The natural fluctuation of these variables is consistent with the health of the spring in question (1). Meaning, when any of the variables differ from normal ranges, the entire aquatic ecosystem associated with the spring degrades as well.

Abnormal algae growth in a spring indicates the spring is in ill health, including the aquifer supplying the spring, and the eco-system in and around the spring. Algae growth in the spring and aquifer system can indicate a higher than average concentration of phosphorus or nitrogen nutrients (pollutants) (4). Both of the pollutants mentioned are in many of Florida’s springs with higher than average concentrations.

Springs displaying abnormal algae growth are directly related to spring health and can be toxic to humans as well. Over 140 algae related cases involving humans have been reported by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). The FDEP now requires limits based on nutrient (pollutant) concentration (mass/volume) in spring water.

It seems that nitrogen-based pollutants attract more media attention than phosphorus based pollutants. The media focus is usually based on complaints about seepage of cattle dung and nitrogen-based fertilizers, from run-off, being absorbed by the landscape, and then absorbed in the local spring and aquifer systems.

Phosphorus-based pollutants are just as deadly to Florida’s aquifer and spring systems as nitrogen-based pollutants. These pollutants also come from cattle and crop production, but phosphorus based pollutants can come from other sources such as phosphate strip mining and mining facilities as well.

The FDEP published a maximum standard for phosphorus concentrations, one of the primary pollutants of concern in state-owned springs. The standards are used to establish benchmarks on the amount of phosphorus found in springs for the protection of Florida’s state-owned aquatic ecosystems. The privately-owned springs and ecosystems are the responsibility of their owners and not regulated by the state of Florida. You can see that Florida officials in FDEP now regulate the state-owned springs and aquatic ecosystems to keep water quality in the acceptable range.

The phosphate industry is issued mining permits by the counties and state of Florida which “permits” the complete removal and destruction of the aquifer and spring systems, which the phosphate industry considers as overburden or waste materials. Historically, Florida’s phosphate industry practices “display” little concern for Florida’s aquatic ecosystems. Since the early twentieth century, west-central Florida earth has been “stripped” of its natural beauty for the phosphate rock just beneath the surface. Florida’s scarred surface, caused by massive draglines in and around Polk County, Florida is only one facet of destroying Florida’s natural resources at a whim. Another issue concerns the natural hydrogeological formations succumbed to the dragline for total decimation. This issue of total decimation of hydrogeological formations does not see much attention and should receive more.

The Whole Truth

Florida’s phosphate industry is not telling the whole truth about their reclamation of existing ex-mining sites. The pursuit of valuable phosphate matrix happens by stripping it “totally” and “completely” out of the earth’s surface some fifty to one hundred feet in depth. The phosphate drag line digs through the aquifer systems, crushing and removing its very existence. An entire local hydrogeological (3) system now fails to do what nature intended, store clean freshwater.

You can see Florida’s phosphate industry practices are detrimental to Florida’s unique natural ecosystems. The phosphate industry cannot reclaim springs and aquifers acre for acre as described by Florida law, simply because the technology to do so does not exist.

However, phosphate industry officials bolster their claims of total land reclamation as seen on local television commercials and other forms of media. Phosphate officials publish reports of complete land reclamation related to former mining sites in localized targeted areas. I know because I see their advertising commercials as well. The reclamation bolstered by the phosphate industry does not include the spring and aquifers systems, because these aquatic systems take nature thousands of years to form.

Reclamation Phase?

I recall riding motorcycles at abandoned mining sites in the 1970’s. The mined “pits” which the phosphate industry abandoned were close to my home as a youth. The abandoned sites I frequented as a youth had no visible enclosure, confinement, containment, or posted warning placards. We used to drive in the abandoned mines pits, directly from a public road unabated and unloaded our bikes and ride for miles inside the abandoned pits. The mining leftovers appeared as barren as a moonscape. Unfortunately, I did not know toxic materials existed in these waste dumps, including heavy metals, piled in highly concentrated mounds.

If one lives in the area of west-central Florida, I challenge you to see for yourself. If one lives in this area, the trip to see the “real” phosphate industry will be but a short car ride. One will see the phosphate industry from a different point of view. The sites mentioned above were numerous, unattended, and still toxic to humans.

The phosphate mining industry in Florida shows many signs of environmental impacts including, abnormal algae growth in Florida’s aquifers and springs, abandoned toxic mining sites, and very few reclamation projects to mention.

Reference

1. Biologist Jim Heffernan, a post-doctoral researcher, and Professor at Florida International University

2. Florida's vanishing springs | Tampa Bay Time

3. Southwest Florida Water Management District

4. The Journey of Water. Florida Springs com

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